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Glossary

T

TALENT
Television announcers.
TAPED OFF
Usually refers to applying racer's tape to the brake duct opening in full-bodied cars.
TARGET TIME
The time allocated for a rally car to complete a road section or special stage. A car that takes longer may suffer added time penalties.
TEAR-OFFS
Transparent plastic strips applied to helmet visors. As these strips accumulate debris, a driver can tear a dirty strip off for a clear view. Drivers in open cars go through about five tear-offs a race.
TECH
Short for tech (or technical) inspection. Each car is submitted to tech inspection so sanctioning body officials can confirm all chassis and engine parts meet series' guidelines. A "teched" car has passed inspections.
TELEMETRY
Highly sophisticated electronics, which transmit performance data back to a team's pit.
TETHER
In Champ Car World Series racing, a braided Kevlar double strap bolted to the wheel on one end and to the chassis on the other keeps the wheel attached to the chassis in case of an accident. NASCAR requires tethers for the front wheels at events on all tracks 1.25 miles or more in length, excluding road courses. Additionally, the series requires hood tethers.
THROTTLE
The gas pedal.
TIME CONTROL
A location where rally cars must stop to have their time of passing recorded by the event organizers.
TIME PENALTY
A car that is running late during a World Rally race will suffer progressive penalties (one minute late = 10 seconds penalty, etc.)
TOE
In order to provide stable tracking during NASCAR or Champ Car World Series races, all four tires are usually pointed slightly inward if viewed from overhead. More toe-in provides more stability but increased tire drag. On high-speed oval tracks, these toe settings are even more crucial. Champ Car World Series teams usually adjust toe with the most unsophisticated methodology seen in racing, using a string around the outside of the car and a caliper to measure the difference in the distance from the string between the front outside of the tire and the rear outside of the tire.
TOP END POWER
The amount a car accelerates at high speeds or in its highest gear.
TORQUE
Measure of engine power, described in foot-pounds of force. 10 foot-pounds of torque would raise 10 pounds of weight one foot in the air. Horsepower is a measurement of torque over a period of time.
TRACK BAR
In calibrating the NASCAR vehicle's "suspension geometry," raising or lowering the track bar changes the rear roll center and determines how well it will travel through the corners. During races, this adjustment is done through the rear window using an extended ratchet. Typically, lowering the track bar will "tighten" the vehicle and raising the track bar will "loosen" it. Also referred to as a "Panhard bar."
TUB
The chassis or monocoque of a Champ Car World Series-style race car.
TUCK UNDER
A NASCAR or Champ Car World Series driver follows an opponent close enough to move into (or tuck under) their draft.
TURBO OR TURBOCHARGER
A device, which pressurizes air, pumps it into the engine and "boosts" a car's performance. Essentially the condensed air increases the air/fuel mixture to create more power.
TURBULENCE
Rough air encountered by racecar drivers.

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